List of Mazda model codes

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This List of Mazda model codes describes following model codes which have been used by Mazda since the 1980s.

Naming scheme[edit]

The company's model codes form the fifth and sixth characters of the VIN on post-1981 vehicles. The first character is a letter representing the platform family, while the second is a sequential letter for the revision of the platform. For example, the Mazda N family used by the Mazda Miata started at NA and was updated in 1998 to NB and in 2006 to NC. The 2016 and newer MX-5s are designated ND.

Mazda generally starts car platforms at the letter "A", but van and truck variants often get different names, usually starting at "V".

Note: The US-built Mazda6 and Tribute do not use the Mazda model code in the VIN; in its place is an AutoAlliance code. Instead of the model code letter, position four in the VIN specifies the vehicle's safety systems, and position five specifies the marque, due to being built in a multi-brand facility.

Old VINs[edit]

Prior to 1981, Mazda used a different VIN format and model code naming scheme. The platforms were given two characters, and the model a third, based on their names.

The following pre-1981 platforms are known:

The next digit of the VIN specified the engine:

Model codes[edit]

D Platform (for subcompact car front-wheel drive cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
DA Ford Festiva (WA) / Mazda 121 (DA) / Kia Pride (1986–1993)

Ford Festiva (WB, WD, WF) / Ford Aspire / Kia Avella (1993–2000)

DB Autozam Revue (1990–1996) Sold as the Mazda 121 outside Japan during the same time period.
DW Mazda Demio (DW) (1996–2002)
Ford Festiva Mini Wagon (1996–2002)
A minor update to the DB.
DY Mazda Demio / Mazda2 (2002–2007)
Mazda Verisa (2004–2015)
The DY is a subcompact platform co-engineered with Ford, which uses it as their B1 platform.[1]
DE Mazda Demio / Mazda2 (2007–2014)[2] The DE is a subcompact platform co-engineered with Ford, which uses it as their B3 platform.[3][4][1]
DJ Mazda Demio / Mazda2 (2014–present)
Toyota Yaris sedan (Canada) / Toyota Yaris R (Mexico) (2015–present)
Scion iA (United States) (2016)
Toyota Yaris iA (United States) (2017–2018)
Toyota Yaris sedan (United States) (2019)
S Platform (for subcompact front-wheel drive minivans)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered
SS Mazda Bongo (1989–1995)
Eunos Cargo (1990)
Ford Spectron (1989–1995)
SR Mazda Bongo Brawny (1990–1993)
SG Mazda Bongo Friendee (1995–2002)
Ford Freda (1995–2000)
B Platform (for compact front-wheel drive cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
BD Mazda Familia/323/GLC (1980–1985)
Ford Laser KA/KB (1981–1985)
This is the first showing of Mazda's SS (self-stabilizing) rear suspension. The two lower parallel links of the rear strut are designed to induce toe-in on the rear tire on the outer side of the curve (e.g. right turn - left rear tire).
BV Mazda Familia Wagon (station wagon) (1981–1986)
BF Mazda Familia/323 (1985–1989)
Ford Laser (KC/KE) (hatchback) (1985–1989)[citation needed]
Mercury Tracer (1987–1989)
Ford/Mecury Capri (1989–1994)
Ford Laser (KC/KE) (station wagon) (1985–1994)
The self stabilizing suspension was updated.
BG Eunos 100 (hatchback) (1989)
Mazda Familia (sedan) (1989–1993)
Mazda Familia (hatchback) (1989-1993)
Mazda Familia Astina (hatchback) (1989–1993)
Ford Laser Coupe (coupe)[citation needed] (1989–1993)
Ford Laser Sedan (sedan) (1989–1993)
Ford Laser hatchback (hatchback) (1989–1993)
Ford Escort (North America) (1991–2002)
Mercury Tracer (1991–1999)
Ford Escort ZX2 (North America) (1998–2003)
The Mazda BG was shared with Ford, which called it CT120.
BH Mazda Familia (sedan) (1994–1997)
Mazda Familia (hatchback) (1994–1997)
Mazda Familia Neo (hatchback) (1994–1997)
Ford Laser hatchback (hatchback) (1994–1997)[citation needed]
Ford Laser Sedan (sedan) (1994–1997)
BW Mazda Familia (station wagon) (1986–1995) BW is a station wagon version of the BF platform.
BJ Mazda Familia (sedan) (1998–2002)
Mazda Familia (hatchback) (1998–2002)
Mazda Familia S-Wagon (station wagon) (1998–2002)
Ford Laser Lidea (sedan) (1998–1999)[citation needed]
Ford Laser Lidea Wagon (station wagon)1998–1999[citation needed]
Mazda 323 (sedan) (1999–2002)
Mazda Protegé (sedan) (1999–2002)
Mazda Protegé5 (station wagon) (1999–2002)
The BJ platform was updated with a lower moment of roll for improved steering, better chassis rigidity, and new engines and transmissions.[citation needed]
BK Mazda Axela/Mazda3 (first generation)
Mazda Premacy/Mazda5 (second generation)
Mazda Biante
The BK platform is Mazda's designation for the Ford C1 platform, which was jointly engineered by Mazda, Volvo and Ford.[5]
BL Mazda Axela/Mazda3 (J68/BL) (2009-2013) The BL platform is partially based on the Ford C1 platform, which was jointly engineered by Mazda, Volvo and Ford.
E Platform (for subcompact front-wheel drive coupes)[a]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
EC Mazda MX-3 (1991–1996)
Autozam AZ-3 (1991–1996)
Mazda AZ-3 (1991–1996)
Eunos Presso (1991–1993)
Eunos 30X (1991–1997)
The 1991 to 1996 EC platform was used by a single car, which was sold under three different names.
G Platform (for mid-size front-wheel drive cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
GC Mazda Capella (1982–1987)
Mazda 626 (1982–1987)
Ford Telstar (1982–1987)
GC was Mazda's first front-wheel drive mid-size car platform. Available body styles were the two-door coupe, four-door sedan, and five-door hatchback. The Ford Telstar hatchback version was called the TX5: there was no Telstar version of the coupe. Production was in Japan, with local assembly in Australia (Telstar only), New Zealand, Taiwan and South Africa, where the model continued in production until 1993.
GD Mazda 626 (sedan) (1987–1992)
Mazda 626 (hatchback) (1987–1992)
Mazda Capella (hatchback) (1987–1992)
Mazda Capella (coupe) (1987–1992)
Mazda Capella (sedan) (1987–1992)
Mazda MX-6 (coupe) (1988–1992)
Ford Probe (hatchback) (1988–1992)
Ford Telstar (sedan) (1987–1996)
Ford Telstar TX5 (hatchback) (1987–1992)
The updated GD platform was introduced in 1987 in Japan and later elsewhere. It spawned a station wagon variant, the GV. Production in the United States started at the AutoAlliance International plant in Flat Rock, Michigan.
GV Mazda Capella Cargo/Wagon (station wagon) (1988–1996)
Ford Telstar Cargo/Wagon (station wagon) (1988–1996)
GV is a station wagon version of the GD platform.
GE Mazda Cronos (sedan) (1991–1993)
Efini MS-6 (hatchback) (1991–1993)
Autozam Clef (sedan) (1992–1993)
Mazda 626 (sedan) (1992–1997)
Mazda 626 (hatchback) (1992–1997)
Mazda MX-6 (coupe) (1991–1997)
Ford Probe (hatchback) (1992–1997)
Ford Telstar (sedan) (1991–1997)
Ford Telstar TX5 (hatchback) (1991–1997)
Kia Credos/Clarus/Parktown (station wagon) (1995–2000)
Kia Carnival mk1(KV-2) (minivan) (1998–2005)
The Japanese market Mazda Capella never used the GE platform. Rather, a new model (the Mazda Cronos) was introduced alongside the Capella, while the Capella continued with the GC platform until 1993 and was then moved to Mazda's CG platform from 1994 through 1997. As Ford and Mazda shared engineering technologies, the GE platform is related to the Ford CDW27/CD162/CD132, used for the Ford Mondeo and Jaguar X-Type.
GF Mazda Capella (sedan) (1997–2002)
Mazda 626 (sedan) (1997–2002)
Mazda 626 (hatchback) (1998–2002)
Ford Telstar (sedan) (1997–1999)
The Capella and 626 were again reunited on the GF platform in 1997. An updated station wagon platform, the GW, was finally introduced as well. See Ford CD2 platform.
GW Mazda Capella Wagon (station wagon) (1997–2001)
Ford Telstar Wagon (station wagon) (1997–1999)
GW is a station wagon version of the GF platform. It had skipped one generation (or two, if the CG Capella is included).
GG Mazda Atenza (sedan) (2002–2007)
Mazda6 (sedan) (2002–2007)
Mazda CX-9 (crossover SUV) ( 2006+)
FAW Besturn (2007+)
American-built Mazda6s use the "1YV" prefix on the VIN. See Ford CD3 platform.

The rear multi-link suspension is remarkably similar to the “E type” found in the HC platform. Although also similar to Ford's own design, Mazda engineers said this is a revival of the “E type” multi-link.

GY Mazda Atenza Sport Wagon (station wagon) (2002–2007)
Mazda6 Wagon (station wagon) (2002–2007)
GY is a station wagon version of the GG platform.
GH Mazda Atenza (sedan) (2008)
Mazda6 (sedan) (2008)
Introduced in 2008, GH is a retuned and revised version of the preceding GG chassis. See Ford CD3 platform.
GJ Mazda6 (sedan) (2012–present)
Hongqi H5 (sedan) (2017–present)
Introduced in 2012, GJ is the platform used on the third-generation Mazda6.
GZ Mazda Atenza Sport Wagon (station wagon) (2008)
Mazda6 Sport Wagon (station wagon) (2008)
GZ is a station wagon version of the GH platform.
C Platform (for mid-size front-wheel drive cars)[b]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
CA Eunos 500 (1992–1993)
Xedos 6 (1996–1999)
The CA platform was developed for Mazda's new upmarket Eunos brand. Just one car, sold under two names, used this platform.
CB Mazda Lantis (hatchback) (1993–1997)
Mazda 323 F (1993–1999)
Mazda 323 Astina (1993–1999)
CG Mazda Capella (sedan) (1994–1996)
Ford Telstar II (sedan) (1994–1996)
CG was very closely related to its predecessors. The CG platform Mazda Capella was designed with a slimmer body than previous models to be marketable in Japan.[6]
CP Ford Ixion (minivan) (1999–2002)
Mazda Premacy (minivan) (1999–2002)
CW Mazda Premacy (minivan) (2010–2018)
M Platform (for mid-size front-wheel drive cars)[c]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered
MA Eunos 300 (sedan) (1989– )
Mazda Persona (sedan) (1988– )
MB Efini MS-8 (sedan) (1992–1995)
T Platform (for mid-size front-wheel drive cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
TA Mazda Millennia (1995–2003) Sold as Xedos 9 in Europe and the Eunos 800 in Japan beginning in 1993.[7]
H Platform (for full-size rear-wheel drive cars)[d]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
HB Mazda Luce (1981–1985)
Mazda 929 (1981–1986)
Mazda Cosmo (1981–1989)
The HB platform was introduced in 1981 as the Mazda Cosmo coupe and Mazda Luce/929 sedan. The Luce was updated in 1986, with the 929 following the next year for some markets, but the Cosmo continued on the HB platform until 1989.
HC Mazda Luce (sedan) (1986–1989)
Mazda 929 (sedan) (1986–1991)
A new Mazda Luce/929 sedan appeared in 1986 on the updated HC platform. The export-version 929 lagged for some markets, and the Cosmo continued unchanged on the HB platform.
HD Efini MS-9 (sedan) (1991–1993)
Mazda Sentia (sedan) (1991–1994)
Mazda 929 (sedan) (1991–1995)
The Luce nameplate was retired in favor of Sentia, but the H platform continued with the 1991 HD revision.
HE Mazda Sentia (sedan) (1995–1998) Export of the 929 was halted after the HD platform, and the Efini marque was gone as well, but the Mazda Sentia continued for one more generation.
J Platform (for full-size rear-wheel drive cars)[e][f]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
JC Eunos Cosmo (luxury coupe) (1990–1995) The JC chassis was a totally new platform developed for 1990s and is unique to the JC Cosmo. Its closest cousin is the HD-929 from 1991–1995. It was a major update from the previous HB platform used by the former 1982–1989 Mazda Cosmo.
L Platform (for front-wheel drive minivans)[g]
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
LV Efini MPV (minivan) (1991–1995)
Mazda MPV (minivan) (1988–1995)
The LV is a rear-wheel drive platform with an all-wheel drive option. It is based on the HC platform used in the Mazda Luce.
LW Mazda MPV (minivan) (1996–2006) The LW platform is front-wheel drive with an all-wheel drive option in some markets. It is based on the GF platform used in the Mazda Capella.
LY Mazda MPV/Mazda 8 (minivan) (2006–present) The LY platform is front-wheel drive with an all-wheel drive option in the Japanese market. It is based on the GY platform used in the Mazda Atenza Sport Wagon.
F Platform (for rear-wheel drive sports cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
FB Mazda RX-7 Savanna (coupe) (1981–1985) The FB chassis was a new name for the SA2 used in the 1979–1980 RX-7 VIN.
FC Mazda RX-7 Savanna (coupe) (1986–1991)
Mazda RX-7 Savanna (convertible) (1986–1991)
The FC platform was quite close to the FB. It also served as the basis for the Mazda MX-5's NA platform.
FD ɛ̃fini RX-7 (coupe) (1991–1995)
Mazda RX-7 (coupe) (1991–2002)
SE Mazda RX-8 (coupe) (2003–2011) The SE platform was the last platform used for a rotary engine-based vehicle. It also served as the basis for the Mazda MX-5's NC platform.
N Platform (for front mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive sports cars)
Code Vehicles and Years Manufactured or Offered Description
NA Mazda MX-5/Miata/Eunos Roadster (convertible) (1989–1997) The NA utilized many components in-house, such as the 323/Familia/Protegé engine and 323 GTX differential (1.6L), RX-7 FC (non-turbo) differential (1.8L) and transmission, but the chassis was unique.
NB Mazda MX-5/Miata/Roadster (convertible) (1998–2005) The NB platform was very close to the NA mechanically. Most changes were related to the vehicle systems, including electrical wiring and a new generation of the Mazda B engine.
NC Mazda MX-5/Miata/Roadster (convertible - soft-top) (2006–2015)
Mazda MX-5/Roadster Power Retractable Hard Top (convertible - hard-top) (2007–2015)
The NC utilized a shortened version of the SE platform used by the RX-8. Many suspension and braking components are interchangeable with the RX-8, while some interior components are shared with the Mazda6, Mazda3 and CX-7.
ND Mazda MX-5/Miata/Roadster (convertible - soft-top) (2016+)
Mazda MX-5/Roadster RF (convertible - hard-top) (2017+)
ND is a new platform for the fourth generation of the MX-5.
NE Fiat 124 Spider Classica/Lusso (Europe) (convertible) (2017+)
Abarth 124 Spider (North America, Europe) (convertible) (2017+)
NE and NF are variants of the ND platform for the 2016 Fiat 124 Spider. While the platform design is similar, the sheet metal and drivetrain are completely different, using the Fiat 1.4 MultiAir turbo 4 cylinder and an updated Mazda NC 6-speed manual transmission.
NF Fiat 124 Spider Classica/Lusso/Abarth (North America, Europe) (convertible) (2017+)
Abarth 124 Spider (North America, Europe) (convertible) (2017+)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The E platform is based on Mazda's B platform.
  2. ^ The C platform is based on Mazda's G platform.
  3. ^ The Mazda AZ-Wagon MD uses the Suzuki M platform, not the Mazda M platform.
  4. ^ The Mazda Carol HB, Mazda Spiano HF and Mazda Laputa HP use the Suzuki H platform, not the Mazda H platform.
  5. ^ The J platform is the basis for the Eunos Cosmo GT car.
  6. ^ The Mazda AZ-Offroad JM uses the Suzuki keicar platform, not the Mazda J platform.
  7. ^ The L platform is the basis for the Mazda MPV family.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mazda2/Demio based on Fiesta"Archived 2008-09-06 at the Wayback Machine, SAE International, 2002-12-01.
  2. ^ McCausland, Evan (December 2, 2009). "First Look: 2011 Mazda Mazda2". Automobile Magazine. Retrieved 2009-12-31.
  3. ^ http://www.miamiherald.com/classifieds/cars/story/1363705.html
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-09-18. Retrieved 2011-06-21.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ Rechtin, Mark (December 21, 2009). "For Mazda and Ford, breaking up is hard to do". Automotive News. Retrieved 2010-01-03.
  6. ^ "MAZDA 100TH ANNIVERSARY | LEGENDARY MAZDAS - CAPELLA (6th) | MAZDA". www2.mazda.com. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  7. ^ "The History of Mazda Millenia". Cars-Directory.NET. Retrieved 7 October 2021.